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About Us

What’s Weekend Bakery?

Weekend Bakery wants to offer and share information, tips, techniques, recipes and tools for the ‘professional’ home baker, with a warm interest in the art of artisan bread making. Weekend Bakery points to the fact that a lot of people, like us, concentrate their baking activities around the weekends and holidays. The moments you look forward to, thinking about what recipes to try out or which favorite loaves to bake.

Weekend Bakery is serious about artisan bread making. We have our own ‘at home micro bakery’. After extensive research we found that the way to great bread leads straight to our home. Making bread in small quantities with time and attention will deliver great and rewarding results. We know that there are excellent artisan bakers to be found in some places. But not everybody has one close by or can afford to buy their bread. So why not try and make your own? It’s a hobby with great benefits for your mind as well as your body. Making good bread appeals to all your senses. Working with dough can be your own form of meditation. Your body can seriously benefit from the bread you make.

So there are lot’s of good reasons to make your own. Maybe you’ve already discovered them. We would love to hear about your bread making and share information. So if you are serious about good bread making, Weekend Bakery is the place for you. Get your hands stuck in a piece of dough and smell the aroma of your own sourdough starter.

Our Artisan At Home Bakery
We are passionate home bakers. We have been sharing our quest for good food and especially good bread for over 15 years. We love sharing our home made bread and baking recipes with friends and family and everybody who’s interested in what we are doing. We are especially enthusiastic about the ‘artisan’ way of baking. Traditional methods, few ingredients, lots of taste. It’s amazing and rewarding to discover you can make a wonderful bread out of flour, water and salt and a bit of home made sourdough.

Taking Home Baking one step further
Good bread needs good material. After baking lot’s of bread in your run of the mill oven and with the aid of your free standing mixer the ambitious home baker begins to feel the limitations. We did, and so we looked further and discovered that there is such a thing as ‘semi professional’ equipment for home and small professional bakers. That’s how we came to be the proud owners of a Rofco baking oven with stone floors and a Haussler Alpha mixer with a serious spiral hook that’s not afraid of a few kilo’s of dough.

Things we love to bake and make
There are some items that we have really ‘made our own’ over the years. Next to the “Pain Rustique’ and Pain au Levain’ that has an ever growing enthusiastic following, we have a few other favorites. We make traditional Dutch specialties like suikerbrood (sugar loaf) speculaas, cinnamon buns and Roggebrood (rye bread). We love making our own pizza and flatbreads and more recently also baguettes. We also make our own marmalade from the Sevilla oranges when in season and do not shy away from all things chocolate and caramel.

And also…home roasting
We are among the small group of people who like to roast their own coffee. Coffee is also a subject we are passionate about and we love to talk about it while drinking a good single estate espresso or cappuccino. Coffee is as interesting as wine, so lot’s to discover and never a boring coffee.

Besides the baking
We love to travel. Our favorite destinations are France, Italy, Norway and Canada. Favorite cities: New York, Venice, Amsterdam.
Also fond of cooking of course, Italian kitchen standing out, also love Indian and Japanese food.
Proud owners of over 150 cookbooks.

Today & The future
More good bread and coffee to share. Bakery visits, workshops, wood fired oven, herb garden, high tea parties, wine tasting, walks in the woods with a puppy, chickens.

Thanks for stopping by at Weekend Bakery!

Ed & Marieke
Netherlands

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16 Responses to About Us

  1. Weekend Bakers says:

    Joey says:
    June 29, 2010 at 16:15

    Hi Ed and Marieke

    We’re coming for a quick visit to the Netherlands during the next two weeks. We’re very enthusiastic (if amateur) artisan bakers from South Africa. We know it’s late notice, but perhaps you have time to chat to us a little, and perhaps we can even watch you bake some? We would really appreciate that, if you have time.

    We were thinking perhaps somewhere in the week starting 12 July? We can adapt ourselves to your schedule.

    I hope to hear from you soon.

    Kind regards,

    Joey Kok
    Reply
    Larry says:
    July 3, 2010 at 18:53

    I enjoy reading through your site, it is very interesting. I like making my own Pizza as well. I am very interested in roasting my own coffee, how did you start?
    Thank You,
    Larry
    Reply
    Marieke says:
    July 4, 2010 at 12:39

    Hello Larry,

    After working for a coffee roasting company in Holland, I discovered that roasting coffee beans can be an art, but that freshness is key. We found that it is hard to find, specialty shops that sell coffee disappointing us, so the only option for us to get fresh good quality coffee was directly from the roaster or going the home roasting way. The last option exited us most, because we like getting to the source and trying to make as much as possible from scratch (like with our bread and pizza etc). First I have to say that the coffee of the roaster I worked for (The Golden Coffee Box/Boot Koffie in Baarn)is in a class of it’s own and it’s the standard of what can be achieved if you truly have the best beans and know exactly how far to roast each bean. But like I said, freshness is an important part and so the main reason for buying a home roaster for us is always having the freshest coffee in the house. I would suggest buying a book about home roasting to take in the fundamentals of roasting (see amazon for this). Find a good source for buying your good quality!green beans. You can also find lots of information by checking out sites like sweetmarias.com and coffeekid.com and coffeegeek.com. When you are ready to buy a home roasting machine I would suggest you buy a good one right away and not go down the route of a popcorn popper or something like that. It’s important to buy a machine that caters to your needs e.g. how much coffee do you make/drink a day. We have two machines: the Alpenroast (a drum roaster no longer in production) and the Hearthware I-roast 2, which is a good machine to start with at about 185 euros. It produces small batches of 150 grams of coffee at a time and you can see the beans through the glass. There are other options as well, so use other people’s experiences to your advantage and read about them first. Next to this, it’s just a lot of fun roasting your own coffee, trying out all kinds of beans, finding your favorites and letting others enjoy it with you.

    Good luck with it and let us know how you are getting along,

    Marieke
    Reply
    Betsy Carey says:
    July 17, 2010 at 17:26

    I love the video of the bread rising. Where did you get that oven? I would like to sign up but can’t find the place to do so. Please advise.

    Betsy

    PS I have roasted my own beans as well.
    Reply
    Marieke says:
    July 17, 2010 at 19:25

    Hi Betsy,

    Thank you very much. You can learn more about our Rofco oven from our posting about it.

    It’s an oven from a small company in Belgium. They aim their product at small shops like little organic stores and the ‘professional’ home baker. Their website: http://www.rofco.be
    You can also find some talk about the Rofco at The Fresh Loaf:
    http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14912/artisan-bread-making-movie-see-timelapsed-ovenspring#comments

    If you have any more questions please let us know.
    I am not sure what you mean exactly by sign up. Can you explain?

    Great you are roasting coffee too? Do you have a home roasting machine?

    Greetings,

    Marieke
    Reply
    Suzanne says:
    July 27, 2010 at 23:13

    Dag Ed en Marieke,

    Ik zag dat jullie een La Cloche Baker hebben. Mag ik vragen waar jullie die hebben gekocht? En: wat zijn jullie ervaringen daarmee?

    Met vriendelijke groet,

    Suzanne
    Reply
    Marieke says:
    July 28, 2010 at 14:38

    Hallo Suzanne,

    Toen wij hem kochten (en naar het zich, na een rondje internet, laat aanzien nu ook nog) kon je hem alleen in Amerika bestellen. (zie: http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=159613).
    De volledige benaming is de ‘Sassafras Round La Cloche Brick Oven’. Belangrijk punt om op te letten is dat je La Cloche qua afmetingen in je oven past (met name de hoogte kan een probleem zijn als je zo’n standaard inbouw-oven hebt. Hij paste wel in ons Boretti fornuis van 90 cm breed, die had genoeg hoogte vanwege de twee ‘verdiepingen’ in deze oven.

    We zijn nu al een tijdje in het gelukkige bezit van een Rofco oven met stenen vloeren, maar tot die tijd hebben we erg veel plezier gehad van de La Cloche. Je kunt ook platte pita-achtige broden bakken, alleen op de stenen schaal, zonder deksel, dat gaat ook heel erg goed.
    Mocht de La Cloche niet passen dan kun je ook nog overwegen alleen een stenen schaal of plaat in je oven te kopen.

    Succes ermee,

    Marieke
    Reply
    Suzanne says:
    July 28, 2010 at 16:22

    Hoi Marieke, dank voor je antwoord. Het is voor mij een luxe-probleem, want ik bak mijn brood altijd in mijn AGA, maar tijdens de zomer bak ik brood in de AGA-companion, en die is niet van gietijzer. In de gewone AGA gebruik ik altijd een steen van chamotte-klei en die gebruik ik ook in de companion, maar ik ben erg nieuwsgierig naar de bakresultaten van La Cloche. Kun je zeggen hoe hoog die Cloche is? Want AGA’s zijn wel diep maar niet heel hoog en ook niet heel erg breed van afmeting. Ik ben overigens ook erg nieuwsgierig naar de Rofco-oven. Hoe goed bevalt ie je?

    Groet, Suzanne
    Reply
    Marieke says:
    July 28, 2010 at 18:30

    Hoi Suzanne,

    Voor de La Cloche moet je toch wel rekening houden met een ruimte van zo’n 40 cm hoogte.
    De Rofco is voor ons echt de beste aanschaf tot nu toe. We hebben nu al vele honderden broden gebakken en hij stelt nooit teleur. Hij is constant en betrouwbaar, we krijgen prachtige korsten (heeft natuurlijk met meer dan alleen de oven te maken)en ook de capaciteit van 6 broden per keer is natuurlijk een vooruitgang als je wat meer wilt bakken. Het is voor ons als zeer enthousiaste micro bakkers denk ik wel het beste tussen hobby en professioneel in. Vooral qua prijs is het een interessante optie (zo’n 1200-1500 euro)en qua ruimte moet je denken aan een klein tafelmodel koelkastje.
    Ik weet niet of je ons broodfilmpje al hebt gezien? Daarmee krijg je ook een goed beeld van de Rofco.

    Groet,

    Marieke
    Reply
    Suzanne says:
    July 28, 2010 at 22:16

    Dag Marieke, wederom dank voor je antwoord. Heb ook naar het filmpje gekeken: wat een mooi deeg en wat een mooi resultaat! Brood bakken is echt verslavend he? Zo’n Rofco lijkt me erg leuk, maar ik moet eerlijk zeggen dat een AGA ook een heel goed resultaat geeft. Gebruikt een Rofco krachtstroom?

    Hartelijke groet, Suzanne
    Reply
    Marieke says:
    July 29, 2010 at 13:12

    Dank je Suzanne,

    De Rofco gebruikt geen krachtstroom maar hij moet wel op een aparte groep.

    Heel veel bakplezier!

    Marieke
    Reply
    Max Hopper says:
    January 13, 2011 at 19:06

    Spotted the article in today’s “De Pers” and was stunned to learn of the undergound in NL.

    Trained at Mammy’s knee in the flora of sourdough and self-cultured several captured from different parts of the globe (Dublin’s was by far the most ‘vibrant’ :) along with starters nicked from baking classes around Europe.

    I must state here that the sources in NL for 10+ percent protein flours, where the ‘standard’ is ‘patent bloem’ which drives me (literally) to DE for materials , evades me and let us not broach the topic of rye (roggen) or spelt. Could use some pointers in this area.

    Also, a very useful source for the not-so-faint-of-heart is the acerbic NNTP newsgroup: rec.food.sourdough

    (can I schedule a timeslot to bake in the Weekend Bakery oven? I am a hand-kneader :)
    Reply
    Marieke says:
    January 14, 2011 at 09:06

    Hi Max,
    Thanks for dropping by! I think we can help you with the flour challenge. We have found a very good supplier for our organic flour needs (wheat, spelt and rye) in our local miller called De Zandhaas in Santpoort (North of Amsterdam). Where are you located, because maybe we could point you to another good supplier. You check organic stores and markets, also for spelt and rye, which in Holland I have never seen in any supermarket (if they sold it, it would probably not be the quality and freshness you are looking for).

    Ed is familiar with the newsgroup you mentioned. If you are interested in checking out our oven and mixer, maybe we can arrange something. We will also be organizing an ‘open bakery’ for a small group of seriously interested bread people somewhere in the spring.

    Happy bread baking,

    Marieke & Ed
    Reply
    Max Hopper says:
    January 14, 2011 at 13:41

    Ik woon in ZH en helaas, daarin meestal bio & eko winkelen spookt.

    I cannot again find the thread on active/instant/sourdough yeasts but fresh is usually available in islamic supermarkets. the common one is Bruggeman’s.
    Reply
    Max Hopper says:
    January 14, 2011 at 18:39

    A plug for the sourdough website that inspired me to bake anew (along with having only atrocious Irish ‘pan’ loaves on store shelves).

    Samartha decodes the illogical “baker’s math” here.
    Reply
    Marieke says:
    January 14, 2011 at 19:04

    Hi Max,
    I’m having a little trouble with the first sentence because it sort of says that bio stores are haunted by ghosts..
    We do not use a lot of (instant dry) yeast but we also use Bruggeman.
    I don’t know if it’s far from where you live but there’s also a Windmill in the town of Vlaardingen that sells flour.
    Molenwinkeltje ‘t Ambacht
    Korte Dijk 16
    3134 HB, Vlaardingen
    Tel: (010)4346131
    E-mail: aeolus.molenwinkel@hetnet.nl

    And you can probably order anything you need via the web store http://www.de-zuidmolen.nl (in Groesbeek in east of Holland) .
    Under 10 kg flour ordered will be delivered to your door at 6,75 shipping costs. They also sell T55 French and American flours and lots more.
    our favorite mill http://www.molendezandhaas.nl in Santpoort NH, can only be visited as far as I know (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) but it is worth it.

    Marieke
    Reply
    Max Hopper says:
    January 16, 2011 at 21:22

    For ll in ZH, during a ‘fietstocht’ today I spotted this (unmarked!) purveyor of flours and shall ring them Wednesday next on the selection.
    Reply
    freerk bos says:
    September 17, 2011 at 19:04

    Hey Ed & Marieke,

    Ik bots net tegen jullie site op, en zit nu dromerig te timelapsen door het oog van de Rofco. Wat een ovenspring! Geweldig. Ik hou jullie in de gaten!
    Reply

    Weekend Bakers says:
    September 18, 2011 at 09:41

    Hallo Freerk,
    Dank voor je gave reactie! We hebben met veel plezier je bakfoto’s zitten bekijken. Je focaccia ziet er fantastisch uit en de vele plaatjes van het open kruim waarderen we ook in hoge mate, veel mensen vergeten dat!

    Happy baking,

    Ed en Marieke
    Reply

    inge says:
    September 23, 2011 at 15:33

    Just a quick note to say thank you for your fantastic site, am a very novice though enthusiastic baker, and am finding all the info on your site extremely valuable. Have a stunning baking weekend. Inge
    Reply

    Weekend Bakers says:
    September 23, 2011 at 17:01

    Hi Inge,
    Thanks for stopping by and your lovely compliment! All our bread recipes have been tried and tested by us at least 10 (or many more) times. We hope you will give some of them a chance and make them your own. It may take some adjusting, because your equipment, ingredients and hands will be different, but that is all part of the baking process.
    Do not hesitate to ask if you have any baking questions or if you have something to add to the baking fun :)

    Lots of loaf,

    Ed and Marieke
    Reply

    Calantha says:
    March 1, 2012 at 21:31

    I foresee this website become a hugely important and exciting resource for me. Thank you so much!
    Reply

    Weekend Bakers says:
    March 2, 2012 at 13:15

    Thank YOU for your wonderful compliment and wishing you lots of baking fun with our recipes and tips!

    Marieke
    Reply

    Basak Yenici says:
    May 14, 2012 at 11:43

    Hi!
    This is a wonderful website. I’m a home baker from Istanbul, and I’d like to learn if there are any workshops I could join. I will be in Amsterdam from 1st of June to 7th.
    Please let me know whether I can participate in
    a) something you organise,
    b) something you recommend, or
    c) come by and help you out for a day.
    Please let me know,
    Basak
    Reply

    Weekend Bakers says:
    May 15, 2012 at 11:34

    Hi Basak,
    Good to hear from you. Thank you very much. I’ve sent you an email with some info.

    Marieke
    Reply

  2. ash says:

    Hi,

    I love ur website. I have written you before alaso, but didn’t get any response. I am in Holland right now wanted to know if you have any workshops that you organise. I wanna learn making breads… tried many time but i am not very successful. Would love to bake a bread wth u guys.

    Regards
    Ash

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Ash,
      Sorry about that. We did send you an email directly (I thought) but maybe something went wrong. I am afraid we do not organize any workshops at the moment, we are just too busy. Can you tell me what you are looking for exactly and in what region you are living in Holland and for how long, maybe we can help you in some other way (contact a fellow baker that organizes workshops for example).

      Greetings,

      Marieke

      • ash says:

        Hi Marieke,

        thanks for your reply, but i didn’t get any mail from you. I am living in Rotterdam till September. I learnt from your website that you are based out of Gouda. Do you have a bakery there??? Can i visit you sometimes? please let me know abou the workshops from other bakers. Also, it would be great if you can advice me about the kind of oven i should buy. I currently have convection and micro combi. and i am not very happy with it.

        Thanks

        Regards
        Ashima

  3. Angela Ting says:

    Hi Marieke,
    I am a brand new home baker who has just started to learn baking from Internet. I have found your website so informative and helpful. Your site is my teacher; it’s important and precious to me. Thank you so much!
    –Angela from New York City

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Angela,

      So nice of you to drop us a line. As you say your bread baking journey has just begun and we can tell you it will only get better as you dive further into the wonderful world of real bread. Learning the skills will guarantee you (and the ones you love) will eat wonderful bread for many years. It is a thankful ‘job’ to be able to bake and share bread with the people who appreciate it. Hope we will be able to keep inspiring you with our recipes and tips.

      Happy Baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  4. Julian Pericles says:

    Hi Ed & Marieke,

    Just writing to say a thank you for your wonderful site. Having always been a keen baker, your recipes have allowed me to step up a notch and have yet to fail me! Being a cinnamon bun fiend I found your site after failing with a few other recipes, and have become famed amongst my friends and family for these buns. Not to mention the stollen with candied fruits and almond paste, nor the kaisersemmeln… I’m learning loads and loving the tastes. Looking so forward to trying your rye bread recipe too (have been in awe of dutch rye bread since a trip to an Amsterdam bakery showed me what it tastes like straight out the oven!).

    Also working as a Barista in speciality coffee I’m thrilled to hear of your roasting.

    Many thanks for sharing, happy Xmas and a happy new year!

    Julian

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Julian,
      Thank you so much for sharing your wonderful baking results with us and liking the recipes so much. We love it when other bakers have such good results with our recipes too. Great the stollen is also a success, I (Marieke) love making it so much. Here in Holland we also make it for Easter, so in a few months time I get to make them again :).
      Hope you like the rye recipe too. We have the rye with raisins and also the Frisian very dark rye which is enormous fun to make too.
      Keep us posted on your results.
      Lots more baking ideas for the new year so hope you will keep track of our adventures.

      Wishing you all the best and a very happy and inspirational (baking and otherwise) New Year!

      Ed & Marieke

  5. James says:

    Hi, thanks for your great website and videos! I’m starting to learn home bread making. Cheers.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Sounds great James thanks for the thumbs up and keep on baking!

      Greetings from Holland,

      Ed & Marieke

  6. MJ Koyuki says:

    I’m a avid novice home baker. My attempts after attempts of trying to bake a baguette were discouraging and disappointing. But after reading your site, I’m inspired and encouraged to attempt again. I’m not sure if I will succeed in baking a perfect baguette. However, I do know I can always find answers and information from your site to improve in my subsequent attempts. Thank you for sharing the information.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Greetings to the lovely Koyuki! (what an amazing dog!)

      Yes, you are right,

      Have a look at our baguette log: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/baguettes-my-home-bakers-log/
      There you can see we tried many times to get to the perfect baguette. With most of our recipes we try and test and practice many times, it is the only way to make progress with baking. Otherwise you just skip from one recipe to the next, never fully understanding what went right or wrong (can be fun, but in the end you will not truly learn how to bake bread).
      And recipes need to be adjusted to your situation, equipment ingredients and hands, and this takes a few turns to get it right.
      So, never be discouraged after the first (or second) time. Make notes and just keep baking. The great thing about making your own is it pretty soon tastes very good, even if it does not look the part yet!

      Thanks and we would love to see some of your results!

      Happy baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  7. Raymundus Butarbutar says:

    Your site is incredible! After failing on my quest to find the a decent croissant in the bay area, I decided to take things on my own matter. The croissant here tend to either be – chewy, dense, and greasy or – overly baked and shatters in an instant (more puff pastry like). The interior shot of your latest croissant is gawk-worthy. And i love your detailed instructions. Will keep you updated on my croissant-making. thanks!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Raymundus,

      Love to hear (and see) more of your croissant making adventures. Thanks so much for your kind words.

      Happy (weekend) baking!

      Greetings from Holland,

      Ed & Marieke